We’d like to introduce the fabulous lactation consultant at MILKALICIOUS Breastfeeding Boutique, JENNIFER RITCHIE. Jennifer and her co-founder JENNIFER KUSIMER are committed to increasing long-term breastfeeding rates by offering breastfeeding support to new mothers. Both founders of Milkalicious are certified through UCSD as Lactation Professionals, and Jennifer Ritchie is currently the Vice President of the Orange County Breastfeeding Coalition.
Milkalicious has offered to host an online forum to answer all your breastfeeding questions this week. Please post any related questions or concerns here.

Tags: breastfeeding, lactation, milkalicious

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Hi Lisa,
Have you ever tried a nipple shield? In addition, what electric pump did you use prior? Do you still have it? There are many flange sizes (the thing that goes on your nipple) that are available. With some more info, I am sure that we can help you with your desire to breastfeed.

Let me know!

Best Regards,
Jennifer Ritchie
Milkalicious

Lisa Grubbs said:
First I would like to explain that I have a rare kidney problem called Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus. I have had it since birth. The disease has to deal with that fact that my kidneys do not function correctly where the water does not return to the body. I dont not really retain much water at all. I drink 4 to 6 gallons of water a day just to keep hydrated.

I am 35 years old and have a 2 year old daughter. I was able to lacatate with her some when she was born. For the first two weeks then had to go to formula with it until she was two months old. When my daughter was born had her see a ped. that understood my problem to make sure she didnt have it. He mentioned to be that since I dont retain water that it would be very hard for me to breastfeed fully. (which I am hoping I find a new way with my daughter). I am pretty well endowed and she had a hard time latching on. I tried manual pumps and one electrical pump but was not able to get suction. My nipples didnt seem to fit into the cup. I dont know if there is a way to get more if my son (est. date of delivery 10/17/09) to be able to have my breast milk since it has also been a deep to have that kind of bond between mother and child.

I am hoping that you might have some suggests for me for the possible be able to produce enough milk for my child and to also know if there is a pump or a way to help him to latch on to have the experience I so dream to have with my child.

Thank you for Your time.

Lisa Grubbs
Hi Maureen,
I was a student at UCSD, they have a LC Program that is unlike any other. My teacher was Gini Baker, and she is AMAZING!! Her website is www.breastfeeding-education.com and she has a ton of information listed. She currently offers a online course to certify you as a lactation educator, and all the info is on Gini's site.

Good luck!
Jennifer Ritchie
Milkalicious

Maureen said:
Hello, I am a new graduate RN but I am also really interested in becoming a lactation consultant. I'm not sure what the process is to becoming a certified lactation consultant and I'm having trouble locating information on this topic. I live in NJ. Just wondering if you have any advice/information.
Thankyou!! Maureen
Hello JT,
A baby will pull off the breast for one of two reasons. Either not enough milk, or too much. Based on your comments, it seems like either stress, or another factor could be interfering with your prolactin levels. This will lead to a decrease in milk supply, and a frantic baby. I would recommend taking a Galactogogue. This can be a food, herb, or drug that help boost your milk supply. Galactogogue foods include: oatmeal (not instant) brown rice, and beans; Galactogogue herbs include fenugreek , blended thistle, and goads rue, and Galactogogues drugs include Motilum and Reglan. The company Motherlove sells a special blend of these herbs in a liquid and capsule form, and many of my clients have had success using it. The two most common Galactogogue drugs are metoclopramide (Reglan) and domperidone (Motilium). Both work by raising prolactin, but Reglan does cross the blood brain barrier and can cause depression. Domperidone does not have this problem. If you have more questions regarding this, let me know.

Best Regards,
Jennifer Ritchie
Milkalicious

JT said:
Sometimes if the flow is too fast for a baby they will bob off the breast to catch their breath. You can lean back in the chair while feeding to stop it from flowing so fast by using gravity against it. Your breasts don't have to change size to produce enough milk. With your second baby your body is more efficient at knowing exactly how much milk to produce so you might not have the same surplus you did with your first baby but if you breastfeed often and on demand you should not have a prob producing enough milk. Make sure you pump each time you give the baby a bottle to keep up the supply.

Kelly Martell Scovel said:
When I had my son 3 years ago, I was overflowing with milk. My breasts went from a B to about a D and I had no problem breastfeeding and did so for about a year. Now, with my 3 month old daughter, I have barely ANY milk, and I don't feel I have done anything different. I am trying to only give her 3oz. of formula a day, but most days it ends up being 6oz. (two bottles) She is very frantic when she breastfeeds, and pulls herself off every couple seconds. I know the milk is coming out because when she pulls away it shoots out! I just want to know what I can do to make more milk for her, and how to encourage her to relax.
Hello Rhonda,
The hormone that prevents you from ovulating while you are breastfeeding is prolactin. Since you are only breastfeeding once a day, you are not producing enough prolactin to suppress ovulation. Therefore, there is nothing telling me that breastfeeding as you are now will keep you from getting pregnant. If you want to cut out that last feeding, just do a little soul searching first. You do not want to regret your decision.

Hope that helps!
Jennifer Ritchie
Milkalicious

Laura Ramirez said:
Ronda, I have a 14month old that I nursed till the day he turned 13mo. At one year he nursed once at 6a, 6p and at night. I began to wean out morning and evening and that is when my period returned. At exactly 13mo I stopped the night nursing (we both were ready since he made a smooth transition) and sure enough I'm now pregnant! My grandmother sweared by the "nursing = birth control", and now I truly believe that too.

Hope that helps and good luck to you!
Laura

Rhonda D Dnyder said:
Hi! I have a 13-month-old daughter who is breastfed. She is down to once-a-day before bed and she's eating tons of solids and drinking vit. D milk. Anyway, my husband and I want to get pregnant again soon (I'm 34), and it just doesn't seem to be happening yet. My periods have been regular since March. Do you think I'm not ovulating? This was mentioned to me recently, that I may need to stop BF before I'll start ovulating again. What do you think?
Hello Angela,
Your body will make the most milk from Midnight to Noon, due to the natural surge in Prolactin. If you would like to pump, this would be the time to do it. You should pump after a feed, and store the milk in the fridge and the freezer (your milk will last 5 days in the fridge or 5 months in the freezer).

Best Regards,
Jennifer Ritchie
Milkalicious

Angela York (Yamamoto) said:
I have 2 children ages 3 weeks and 2 years old...I'm tandem nursing. My youngest nurses every 3 hours and my 2 year old 1 to 2 times a day. I'd like to build up extra milk for my youngest when my hubby & I have date nights so that our dates don't have to be so short. However when I'm pumping I'm not getting too much -- 1 to 2 ounces at best. Any suggestions/tips?
Hello Leslie,
If you are interested in becoming a breastmilk donor, contact the San Jose Mother’s Milk Bank at 408.998.4550. An initial screening is done in 10 minutes over the phone. Once you pass the requirements and become a certified milk donor, you will receive the instructions on how to ship your milk to them.
Shipping your milk is simple and costs you nothing. Once you have collected at least 100 ounces of breastmilk and stored it in your freezer for no more than 3 months, you can call the Mother’s Milk Bank. They will send a cooler to you in 2-3 days. All you have to do is pack it and ship it. The Mother’s Milk Bank will cover the cost for shipping. You may also receive reimbursement for the bags or bottles you’ve used to store and ship the milk in.

Best Regards,
Jennifer Ritchie
Milkalicious

Leslie Reed said:
Hi Jennifer,

I am really curious about donating breast milk. I have been looking on the internet for information about this subject, but everything that I have found is for the woman/baby receiving the donated milk. Who can donate milk? When? Can you point me toward more information about when it would be appropriate for a mother to donate milk?

Thank you,

Leslie
Hello Stephanie,
This is a normal feeding pattern for a newborn. But, in order to help keep the baby awake, try these two tricks. #1 Breast Compressions: When your baby takes a longer than normal pause, compress the breast and shoot some milk into her mouth. This will reminder her that she is there too eat, and is less likely to fall asleep. #2 The Milk Pump: Pump her arm if she pauses too long, and she will begin eating again. Falling asleep on the breast is very normal due to the release of oxitocin while breastfeeding.

Best Regards,
Jennifer Ritchie
Milkalicious

Stephanie Fricke said:
My 3 1/2 week old daughter falls asleep while breastfeeding. I do switch breasts and burp and/or change her diaper to help wake her. But soon after she begins to nurse, she falls into sleep again. She feeds about every 60-90 minutes through out the day. She sleeps a bit longer during the early morning hours. My question is... Is this a normal or good pattern to be in? It seems she is using the breast as a pacifier. Is this a good habit? Any suggestions/advice would be appreciated.
Hello,
An abscess is a localized collection of pus that forms from an infection that has no opening for drainage. Subareolar abscesses tend to recur until the affected glands are surgically removed, and antibiotic therapy alone will not be enough. It is safe to nurse with what you describe, but you may have some pain. You will have to wait and see how it feels. Remember, the baby is a product of you.

I would like to recommend that you take Lecithcin once the baby is born, to prevent plugged ducts and mastitis. Take one 1200 milligram capsule 3-4 times a day. This will decrease the viscosity (stickiness) of the milk, by increasing the % of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the milk.

For the yeast issue, I would definitely recommend you get on a GR1 probiotic. Breastfeeding produces a warm wet environment, and we do not want you to get Thrush (yeast infection of the nipple and babies mouth).

Best Regards,
Jennifer Ritchie
Milkalicious

goddess said:
Two years ago, I experienced what doctors would call a subareolar abcess that I believe came from an ingrown hair around my nipple. It became inflamed and needed to be lanced and drained. It had since went away, only to resurface when I got pregnant. I've had it lanced and drained a couple more times during my pregnancy and again it has gone down and is no longer swollen or draining profusely. However, it does still leak a small amount of pus everynow and then, the nipple sometimes leaks and itches and the fluids still smell like infection. I'm 28 yrs old and 37 weeks with my first child. My midwives have informed me that I should be okay and that my son will be able to nurse normally but since this forum is open, I was wondering for myself and any other mothers out there, is it really okay for my son to nurse from a nipple that might still be infected. Will mastitis be more eminent being my history with this breast? And, how can I clear up the infection that is apparently deep within the breast without antibiotics? I get yeast infections seems like upon sheer mention of them!!! I eat alot of garlic, drink apple cider vinegar and lead a great diet consuming only fish and hormone/antibiotic free turkey and a little chicken. This has been my only issue throughout my pregnancy. No sickness or ill feelings at all!!! But, I do want to nurse my son and just want to make double sure that it will be safe...!!! Thanks, Milkalicious!!!!
I have serious depression issues which are greatly aggravated by postpartum and breastfeeding hormones. I have 4 kids and not made it past 6 weeks of BF with any of them bc of the depression (I also had issues with having too little milk production which I attributed to PPD). It gets so bad that I can't stand anything touching my skin (and a host of other conditions: hot flashes, fatigue, restlessness, insomnia, etc). I am interested in knowing (if we are blessed with another child) what, if anything, I can do to make it possible to BF for a long period of time. My OB put me on Zoloft (only) and this did not solve the issues and because it is the only proven safe AD, I didn't try anything else. This same issue has caused my sister-in-law to stop breastfeeding. She has actually been to a gynecological endocrinologist who ran the gamut of testing and everything came out "normal"...but still she suffers (even though she stopped BF about 2 months ago).

I am also interested in knowing if lactation can be re-started (my baby is now seven months old)? I know I would have to go off of my depression medicine (Zoloft, Seroquel, and Xanax) but if you are able to give me advice on the above issue, that may not be a problem.

Thank you so much!!
HI there,
I am almost 20 weeks pregnant and still breastfeeding my one year old son. I didnt feel ready to stop when I found out I was pregnant again and decided to continue to breastfeed. Now I feel that my milk production is quite a bit lower than it was and I am also not nursing my son very often- maybe twice a day- and I am the one that offers it to him. I try to offer him more throughout the day but he has little to no interest. So I guess I am wondering if I should just continue to nurse the way I have been or is it time for me to stop now, I think that I am doing it more for me than for him. I know that there are health benefits and I want my son to get everything that he needs from me. I also look forward to the added benefit of having an older child who can help me with engorgement and increasing my milk production for the new nursling. Is my sons lack of interest in nursing a sign that I should stop?
Thanks for your time.
Kelly Sharp.
Hi Heather,
Anxiety runs in my family, and I am a breastfeeding mom that takes 150mg of Zoloft. I know how hard it is to juggle all of our responsibilities as moms, and continue to breastfeed. I clear all medications with my reference book "Medications and Mothers Milk" by Tomas Hale. All SSRI's are compatible with breastfeeding, per Dr. Hale, but some are better than others due to the 1/2 life of the drug. Zoloft and Paxil are the best to take, and I have uploaded .PDF files of the drug information for you. I have also included the information on Xanax.

In addition, it is possible to re-lactate while taking your SSRI. Here is a link to Dr. Jack Newman's protocol http://www.asklenore.info/breastfeeding/induced_lactation/accelerat...

Best Regards,
Jennifer Ritchie
Milkalicious

Heather Lea TenEyck said:
I have serious depression issues which are greatly aggravated by postpartum and breastfeeding hormones. I have 4 kids and not made it past 6 weeks of BF with any of them bc of the depression (I also had issues with having too little milk production which I attributed to PPD). It gets so bad that I can't stand anything touching my skin (and a host of other conditions: hot flashes, fatigue, restlessness, insomnia, etc). I am interested in knowing (if we are blessed with another child) what, if anything, I can do to make it possible to BF for a long period of time. My OB put me on Zoloft (only) and this did not solve the issues and because it is the only proven safe AD, I didn't try anything else. This same issue has caused my sister-in-law to stop breastfeeding. She has actually been to a gynecological endocrinologist who ran the gamut of testing and everything came out "normal"...but still she suffers (even though she stopped BF about 2 months ago).
I am also interested in knowing if lactation can be re-started (my baby is now seven months old)? I know I would have to go off of my depression medicine (Zoloft, Seroquel, and Xanax) but if you are able to give me advice on the above issue, that may not be a problem.
Thank you so much!!
Attachments:
Hi, I have recently read that breast milk changes as your baby grows. That when your baby is first born, you make milk that is especially designed for infants and once your baby is older, your body makes milk especially for toddlers. Even if your baby is premature, you make milk designed especially for premies. Is this true? And if it is, what about the milk changes? I'm especially interested in knowing what makes the perfect design for "toddler milk". I find myself trying to gather ammunition that I can use towards my mother-in-law when she makes comments about my son being too old to breastfeed. He's only 9 months right now, so the journey ahead looks long and bleak.
Thanks so much,
Bonnie.

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