I'm planning on giving birth in a hospital 45 minutes away from our home. I'd like to stay at home for as long as possible during my labor, but I probably won't be able to stay home as long as I'd like because the drive will be so long.

So I'm trying to wrap my brain around the fact that I will probably have to labor for quite a while in the hospital. My husband and I are hoping and prepping for a natural birth and the idea of being in the hospital for a while scares me a little...so much that we even thought about getting a hotel room somewhere very close to the hospital and checking in when I go into labor!

I hear so many negative hospital birth stories. Does anyone have any positive ones? By 'positive' I don't necessarily mean that nothing went wrong...just that baby was healthy and mother was happy with her birth experience.

Stories like this will be very helpful to me right now! Thanks! :)

Tags: birth, fears, hospital, labor, positive, stories

Views: 308

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I had my baby in the hospital and the nurses were very helpful. I also had a doula to help us along the way which was such a great help! I don't know if I would have been able to continue without an epidural if she wasn't around. I was induced with PIT and almost my entire birth plan went out the door. I had an IV, external fetal monitoring and internal fetal monitoring, bag was broken, etc. but I didn't ask for the epidural.

I was close to having a C-section but my nurses tried different ways to fix the problem. My daughter's heart rate was going down. They thought that maybe she was squeezing the umbilical cord because they had broken my bag. They tried something and it worked. Her heart rate went up and I was continuing to labor with a c-section.

I think it helps to go over your plan with your nurses and they can really help you have the birth experience you want.
I found having a doula that understood my birth plan and had experience dealing with hospital staff really provided for a better experience than what many other women report who aim to have a natural birth in a hospital environment. Good luck to you : )
My son was born at a hospital. I was expecting it to be a very negative experience. I had prepared to deliver with midwives at a different hospital, but switched at the last minute because the other hospital had some policies that I found to be horrid. (Immediate separation of mother/baby after birth for an hour). I also liked being within my zone of comfort, and became inhibited around people.

It turned out fine, though. There were some expected hospital-style annoyances, but they let me do my thing and move around and make my noises and didn't push the painkillers too hard.

My birth SHOULD have been annoying. I switched to the new hospital at 38 weeks, didn't know any of the OBGyns that were in the practice, and all that anyone knew about me was that I didn't want painkillers. But by just knowing exactly what I wanted, and not letting anyone destroy my focus, it was actually very wonderful and empowering. It taught me a very valuable lesson. The birth happens mostly within your body, and the experience happens mostly within your mind. Staying within my body and within my mind and just focusing on what was happening from moment to moment made my labor very pleasant.

When you're completely focused on giving birth, the surroundings stop mattering and all that matters is what your body is doing.

Don't be afraid to ask "why", and suggest alternatives. If they want you to lay down for monitoring, ask them to figure out a way to monitor you while you're standing, etc. And just remember that you can do it. If you become annoyed with the nurses or anyone else at any point, tell your husband that he is the only one you are going to pay attention to, and try to block out everyone else when they talk. Let your husband decide what is and is not important to bother you with. That way it's him that's saying "no" to any unwanted pain meds, and you're totally free to focus.

Know what you want, ask for it firmly and politely, and most of the time the doctors and nurses will respect you enough to help you reach your goals.

RSS

FOLLOW US ON

Follow My Best Birth on Twitter or join us on Facebook.

Sponsors











© 2014   Created by MyBestBirth Admin.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service