I used a Snugli in the beginning. But I found out about the Traditional African Wrap and soon it became the only one I used. I continued to use it until my son was about 2. It can be used w/newborns to carry up fromt or on the back. It's jsut a long, wide piece of cloth making it one of the cheapest most readlity available options. Anyone else use this type of sling?

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Sounds like the kind I want to get into once my little one arrives! Have you found a good website that has easy directions for learning how to wrap this type of sling? And did you make your own? If so, is there a particular fabric that works well? Is it best to have a tight fabric with no give or one with a bit of stretch to it? With my first I wore a Snugli as well for a bit, but really want to get into baby wearing more once the second one comes, especially because the two will be close in age and I think I'm going to need as many hands free as I can get!
The greatest resource I found is www.wearyourbaby.com they cover all types of slings and wraps, have detailed instructions w/pic on how to use each one for various positions and even how to make your own, including the best type of fabric to use.

I used the instructions for how to make your own no-sew wrap that can be found at http://www.wearyourbaby.com/Default.aspx?tabid=121

I found that 15 feet was just to long for me but I am a very small person. So maybe start w/that and cut it shorter if that is too long--thats what I did. Fleece was just to hot for my son so I went w/a lightweight cotton, gauzy type fabric. It needs to be strong but have some give (stretchy but not so stretchy that it lossens as you wear it).

The site includes a link w/instructions on how to use a wrap for many different positions. I used the Front Wrap cross tie for front carries and as he got older and wanted to see more I used the hip cross carry. The back wrap cross was OK but I found that I liked the carries used in these videos better: The podego carries can also be done w/a wrap and are very much like the carries in these videos.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K6ICsaGzxAM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytnu9KNaty8&NR=1

They look hard but are pretty easy to master, and one you get it you can tie the baby on in no time. I practiced w/ a doll first and in no time I was a pro :)

I also recieved a mai-tai wrap from a friend and loved it too. However I found that my son seemed more comfortable in the traditional wrap esp as he got older, the straps from the mai tai cut into his legs.

Hope this helps :) Lemme know how it goes.
No, that doesn't help. I believe the topic is African wraps.
I believe the African Wrap is called a Kanga. I found this website Peppermint
You are right, it is :) But I found that when I searched for Kanga I got the "Kanga" brand baby carrier not info on a traditional wrap. An African woman I know sent me to this link, she said that although they do not refer to it as a traditional African wrap or a Kanga it is the best American resource for making and using it.
That website is great. Thanks for the link :) I notice that they are no longer available. I wonder if that is temporary? I am going to check back and see if it changes. I really like the fabrics they use and have a hard time finding such pretty/traditional prints in my local fabric stores. If you find anymore resources like this I would love to have them :)
Here you go Sara :)
Sorry about the other link. Kanga USA
An African Wrap is called a Kanga. It is a wide long piece of fabric usually 3 ft x 15 ft that is not sewn at all (they use these kangas for many things, including skirts and shirts). The instructions and link I provided are how to make one using a piece of cotton fabric. The site does not refer to them as African Wraps they simply use the term "wrap" but technically all wraps are derived from either the African or Asian traditional wraps. If you do a search for "kanga" baby wraps you will get links to the proprietary "Kanga" brand baby carrier which is not a traditional wrap.

I learned about them from one of the parents of a child in my class. She was born and raised in Africa and used these types of wraps. She is the one that gave me the link I posted she said it was the best American resource for how to make one, the types of fabric to use, and how to do the various carries.

I am sorry that you did not find this info. useful. But I am glad that the person that requested it did.
Sara, thanks for all the great info and links! I'll be sure to check them out and do some practicing before the little one gets here! :)

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