I just had my 30 week check up and my OB mentioned inducing me at 39-40 weeks because I have gestational diabetes. I know GD babies are sometimes larger but I want to do EVERYTHING possible to avoid being induced. I had this nice, natural birth with as little medical intervention as possible all planned out in my head. Now I'm freaking out a little!

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UGGGG!!! GD babies also have under-developed lungs which take longer to mature. This inducing due to big baby syndrome is sweeping the nation!
Just remember everything is your choice. They can't induce you if you don't want to be induced.
Also they induce bigger babies for fear of shoulder dystocia and such which has little to do with baby's size. Head size, positioning, your pelvis has much more to do with it.
Also if they try to induce and you're not favorable you can end up with a c/s, just about as far away from your NCB as one can get!
Stand your ground, ask more qestions and do your research! GOOD LUCK!
Thanks ladies! I appreciate the input. I'm hoping that since I'll be seeing my OB every week from here on out and following the GD diet closely, there won't be a need for her to bring up induction again. But my husband and I are both VERY against it.
If you keep your diabetes in check with your diet and close monitoring, is there still a risk of a large baby? I personally tend to think that the hype about large babies isn't necessarily warranted. Women have birthed 10 lb babies for a long time now. Three of my four babies were over 8 pounds, and I'm only 5'1" tall and generally about 120 pounds when I'm not pregnant. Something else to keep in mind is that ultrasound is not very accurate in determining a baby's size if it's done in the last trimester. It's most effective in the first trimester.

I would do everything possible to stay healthy and low-risk, including whatever you can do to keep your diabetes under control. One thing I'd like to share is something I got in my doula training. It's called "Key Questions About Your Care" and was written by Penny Simkin. You can use this when talking with your OB about your situation:

Answers to the following questions will help you participate in your care responsibly and help you know what to expect.

When A Test is Suggested:

1. What is the reason for it? What problem are we looking for?
2. What will it tell us? How accurate or reliable are the results?
3. If the test detects a problem, what will happen next?
4. If the test does not detect a problem, what will happen next?

When A Treatment of Intervention is Suggested:

1. What is the problem? Why is it a problem? How serious is it? How urgent is it that we begin treatment?
2. Describe the treatment. How is it done? How likely is it to detect or solve the problem?
3. If it does not succeed, what are the next steps?
4. Are there risks or side-effects to the treatment?
5. Are there any alternatives (including waiting or doing nothing?)
6. Ask questions 2, 3, and 4 about any alternatives.

In an emergency it may be impossible to fully explore these questions. Your caregiver should tell you how serious and urgent a situation is.
Thank you for the tips and information Cherylyn, :D
Is your doctor planning on doing an u/s closer to your due date to get an estimated weight for your baby? Because with out an real idea of how big your baby is, it doesn't make much sense to go on "chance". With my son I didn't have GD but he was a big boy. He was born on his due date weighing in at 8lbs 14oz 21 inches. And I am only 4'11", prepregnancy 110lbs. I managed to have my son naturally, however we didn't need the vacuum as intervention during delivery. But either way, if you really want to do this as natural as possible, talk to your doctor in further detail about it, and ask for an u/s closer to your due date. Best of luck! :)
Yes she is going to do a u/s at 36 weeks. My hubby and doula are both completely in agreement and supportive of my wishes so they will able to be my voice even if I am not in the state of mind to do so. I also created a birth plan last night.

Bryana Edwards said:
Is your doctor planning on doing an u/s closer to your due date to get an estimated weight for your baby? Because with out an real idea of how big your baby is, it doesn't make much sense to go on "chance". With my son I didn't have GD but he was a big boy. He was born on his due date weighing in at 8lbs 14oz 21 inches. And I am only 4'11", prepregnancy 110lbs. I managed to have my son naturally, however we didn't need the vacuum as intervention during delivery. But either way, if you really want to do this as natural as possible, talk to your doctor in further detail about it, and ask for an u/s closer to your due date. Best of luck! :)
Amen Lisa. I'm a fourth time mother who has delivered a 9+lb baby in 2 hrs with 5 minutes of pushing, no tearing or lacerations at all. Yet, still, the OB that is backing my midwife wants an ultrasound to make sure that "baby isn't too big." Seriously? Like I'd give a rat's patoot if he said that baby was 10lbs or 11lbs, for that matter. I'm still delivering him vaginally, barring distress or other circumstances. I HATE electing cesareans or induction for "big baby." Actually, I think I read a study not too long ago that said that research has shown that there is absolutely NO benefit to moms with GD or "big babies" to induce pre-due date.

For a little anecdotal encouragement: I have a friend who delivered an almost 12lb GD baby who was 5'2" and about 120lbs pre-pregnancy. Of course, her GD was out of control. But she was not induced and delivered him vaginally at 41 wks. She stood up the induction date.

And, an online acquaintance had a terrible experience facing what you are facing. She had GD and her 36 wk ultrasound showed that baby was over 8lbs already. So they scheduled her induction at 37 wks. Long story short, her cervix wasn't ripe enough for it, it led to fetal distress and cesarean section. The baby was less than 6lbs and on oxygen for 3 days.
I just wanted to encourage you to do some independant research on GD. Ask the opinion of a home birth midwife about the condition ( not that you will use her) there are lots of studies out there I really don't think it's a reason to freak out and I had a big baby myself at home 9 an 1/2 lbs 45 minute labor 4 pushing contractions no tearing that in itself tells you that you could go even further in weight and not really have that bad of a time. Just remember part of the responsibility for a wonderful birth is keeping yourself healthy and low risk, keep up with your diet and exercises you'll be great!

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